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Topical Vancomycin for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection after Craniotomy: Meta-analysis and Systematic Literature Review

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submitted on 2023-10-18, 07:57 and posted on 2023-10-18, 09:27 authored by Ahmed Saleh, Abdulnasser Thabet, Sirajeddin Belkhair

Objective

There is no consensus among neurosurgeons regarding whether the application of topical vancomycin after performing craniotomy has a role in reduction of the risk of surgical site infection and consequently reduction of treatment costs. In order to compare the rate of surgical site infections after craniotomies with and without the use of topical vancomycin, a meta-analysis of the available studies in the literature was carried out.

Methods

Multiple electronic health databases were searched to identify all the studies published from July 1988 to July 2021 that examined the role of application of topical vancomycin in reduction of the risk of surgical site infection after craniotomy (cSSIs). Effect sizes were expressed in pooled odds ratio (OR) estimates and, because of heterogeneity between studies, random effect of the inverse variance weighted method was used to perform the meta-analysis.

Results

Three observational retrospective cohort studies and 1 prospective controlled cohort study were identified, comparing the incidence of surgical site infection after 605 craniotomies in which topical vancomycin was used and after 716 craniotomies in which no such intervention was done. Meta-analysis showed that topical vancomycin decreased incidence of cSSIs (OR 0.13; 95% confidence interval 0.04–0.43).

Conclusions

The results of this meta-analysis suggest that the use of topical vancomycin after performing craniotomies is safe and effective in decreasing the incidence of cSSIs, although there is a need to perform randomized controlled trials to strongly support this conclusion.

Other Information

Published in: World Neurosurgery
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
See article on publisher's website: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2021.11.018

Funding

Open Access funding provided by the Qatar National Library

History

Language

  • English

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication Year

  • 2022

License statement

This Item is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Institution affiliated with

  • Hamad Medical Corporation
  • Neurosciences Institute - HMC

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