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Shock effects of monovalent cationic salts on seawater cultivated granular sludge

journal contribution
submitted on 2023-10-08, 06:54 and posted on 2023-10-15, 09:57 authored by Raghavendran Sivasubramanian, Guang-hao Chen, Hamish Robert Mackey

Saline wastewater is commonly encountered in various industries, posing challenges to biological treatments. The application of seawater as a seed source provides a media of diverse halophilic organisms for rapid startup. However, effects of transitioning from a mixed salt source to monovalent salt solutions prevalent in industry remains unexplored. Hence, seed sludge was cultivated using seawater and later granulated under a mixed-salt synthetic medium comprising a mixture of NaCl, KCl and Na2SO4 at a combined concentration of 0.8 M (0.27 M each). The stable, acclimated granules were then tested against single salt media of 0.8 M NaCl, KCl, or Na2SO4. Shift to single salt media resulted in granule disaggregation, poor settling, sludge washout and development of fluffy or slimy flocs. Changes in exopolysaccharides composition after the single salt shift was the predominant reason for the large changes in sludge morphology. The impacts of KCl and Na2SO4 were more significant than the shift to NaCl. The resulting impacts also had a major influence on the treatment performance. A complex mechanism involving monovalent cation stimulation of proteins; ionic strength impacts on exopolysaccharides and morphology; solution density influence on sludge density and settling; and tonicity impacts on cell viability and treatment is described.

Other Information

Published in: Journal of Hazardous Materials
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
See article on publisher's website: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.123646

Funding

Open Access funding provided by the Qatar National Library

History

Language

  • English

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication Year

  • 2021

License statement

This Item is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Institution affiliated with

  • Hamad Bin Khalifa University
  • College of Science and Engineering - HBKU

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