Manara - Qatar Research Repository
Browse
1-s2.0-S2589936820300323-main.pdf (824.77 kB)

Renin-Angiotensin System overactivation in polycystic ovary syndrome, a risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection?

Download (824.77 kB)
journal contribution
submitted on 2023-10-08, 07:43 and posted on 2023-10-08, 08:24 authored by Abu Saleh Md Moin, Thozhukat Sathyapalan, Stephen L. Atkin, Alexandra E. Butler

Background

The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus gains entry to target cells via the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor present on cells in blood vessels, lungs, heart, intestines, and kidneys. Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) overactivity has also been described in metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity, conditions shared by women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) We hypothesized that RAS overactivity may be present in PCOS.

Methods

We determined plasma levels of RAS-related proteins in a cohort of age matched control women (n = 97) and women with PCOS (n = 146). Plasma levels of RAS-related proteins (ACE2, Renin and Angiotensinogen (AGT)) were determined by Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMA)-scan plasma protein measurement.

Results

PCOS women had a higher BMI (p < 0.001), systolic (p < 0.0001) and diastolic (p < 0.05) blood pressure, waist circumference (p < 0.0001), testosterone (p < 0.0001), free androgen index (p < 0.0001) and CRP (p < 0.0001). Renin was elevated in PCOS (p < 0.05) and angiotensinogen was lower in PCOS (p < 0.05), indicating overactivity of the RAS system in PCOS. ACE2 levels were lower in PCOS (p < 0.05), suggesting that PCOS women are at risk for development of hypertension.

Conclusion

RAS proteins levels differed between PCOS and control women, suggesting that the insulin resistance inherent in PCOS may predispose these women to more severe COVID-19 infection.

Other Information

Published in: Metabolism Open
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
See article on publisher's website: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.metop.2020.100052

Funding

Open Access funding provided by the Qatar National Library

History

Language

  • English

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication Year

  • 2020

License statement

This Item is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Institution affiliated with

  • Hamad Bin Khalifa University
  • Qatar Biomedical Research Institute - HBKU

Usage metrics

    Qatar Biomedical Research Institute - HBKU

    Licence

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC