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Patterns of horse and camel- related injuries: A descriptive analysis from a national trauma registry (2007–2021)

journal contribution
submitted on 2024-01-29, 07:05 and posted on 2024-01-29, 07:06 authored by Ayman El-Menyar, Naushad A. Khan, Syed G.A. Naqvi, Hassan Al-Thani

Background

The large animal-related injuries are emerging major trauma but remain underestimated public health problem worldwide. We aimed to determine the incidence, clinical characteristics, mechanisms and patterns of horse and camel-related injuries (HCRIs) in a Middle Eastern country.

Methods

A retrospective analysis of all patients who were hospitalized due to HCRIs was conducted. Data included patient's demographics, mechanism of injury, anatomical location and severity of injury, and hospital outcomes.

Results

Between November 2007 and December 2021, there were 273 hospitalized patients with HCRIs representing1.3 % of the total trauma admissions. Of these, 145 (53.1 %) and 128 (46.9 %) were horse (HRI) and camel-related injuries (CRI) respectively. The most common presenting age group of the cohort was 20–29 years and 88 % were males. Patients with HRIs were younger (27.5 ± 11 years) than CRIs (34 ± 13.5 years). Injuries to the extremities were the most common (62 % vs. 40 %), followed by the head injury (25.5 % vs. 31 %) among the HRIs and CRIs, respectively. The most common mechanism of injury was falling off followed by getting kicked by the HCRIs. Major trauma (ISS ≥12) was found in 23 % of HRIs (47.5 %) and CRIs (52.5 %). Only 5 % of patients had shock index >0.90 on admission; two thirds were due to CRIs. There were four fatalities (1.5 %), all attributed to traumatic brain injury, of which three were due to HRIs and one due to CRIs.

Conclusion

This study reveals that HCRIs predominantly affect young adult males and may involve serious injuries, exhibit distinct injury patterns, however, it is associated with low mortality. Preventive measures need to be revisited.

Other Information

Published in: Injury
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
See article on publisher's website: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2023.111093

Funding

Open Access funding provided by the Qatar National Library.

History

Language

  • English

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication Year

  • 2023

License statement

This Item is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Institution affiliated with

  • Hamad Medical Corporation
  • Hamad General Hospital - HMC
  • Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (-2015)

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