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Do students' self-reflections of performance align with their graded performance in objective structured clinical exams?

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submitted on 2024-05-16, 07:13 and posted on 2024-05-16, 07:14 authored by Angelina S. Lim, Sunanthiny Krishnan, George Tan, Derek Stewart, Tarik Al-Diery

Introduction

Self-awareness of strengths and weaknesses through self-reflection are important for life-long learning and development. The aim of this study was to assess the alignment in third-year undergraduate pharmacy students' self-reflections of their objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) performance to their actual OSCE scores and explore the most common aspects students reflected on as markers of perceived performance.


Methods

Students completed a three-station OSCE and a written self-reflection about their performance. These reflections were coded using a latent pattern content analysis, with categories defined as “doing well (≥ 50% on exam)” and “not doing well (< 50% on exam)” and compared to their actual OSCE exam scores, to determine the degree of alignment.


Results

Two hundred sixty-nine students completed the OSCE and reflection. Students had a low degree of alignment between their self-reflections and actual OSCE performance. Low alignment was overwhelmingly prevalent and significant in high-achieving students with OSCE scores of ≥90%. Most common aspects students reflected on as indicators of performance were finishing on time and communicating effectively. High-achieving students reflected on aspects such as empathy, systematic questioning, and patient teach-back as aspects of their performance.


Conclusions

Student reflections on exam performance do not align with their actual performance, particularly amongst the high-achieving students. High-achieving students were more aware of the different aspects that affected their performance. To ensure that high-achieving students are aware of their strengths, educators should provide more targeted feedback mechanisms and positive reassurances to help these students become more confident in their decision-making skills.

Other Information

Published in: Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
See article on publisher's website: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cptl.2024.04.013

Funding

Open Access funding provided by the Qatar National Library.

History

Language

  • English

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication Year

  • 2024

License statement

This Item is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Institution affiliated with

  • Qatar University
  • Qatar University Health - QU
  • College of Pharmacy - QU HEALTH

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