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Clinical Phenotyping and Multimodal Treatment of Men With Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome From the Middle East and North Africa: Determining Treatment Outcomes and Predictors of Clinical Improvement

journal contribution
submitted on 2023-12-06, 07:15 and posted on 2023-12-06, 11:30 authored by Ahmad Majzoub, Mohammed Mahdi, Ibrahim Khalil, Ahmed Al Saeedi, Khalid Al Rumaihi

Objective

To evaluate the effectiveness of UPOINT based multimodal treatment on patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), and determine factors that could be associated with clinical improvement.

Methods

A retrospective study was conducted in Doha, Qatar including patients with CP/CPPS from the Middle East and North Africa. The UPOINT phenotyping system was used to classify patients and guide their multimodal therapy. NIH-CPSI scores were computed initially and after 3 months of treatment, and predictors of clinical improvement were assessed.

Results

The total NIH-CPSI improved significantly with a mean reduction of 8.21 after 3 months of treatment (P < .001). 66.2% of patients had a clinical improvement demonstrated as a total NIH-CPSI score reduction by at least 6 points after 3 months of treatment. No significant association was found between clinical improvement, and extent of pain (ORa = 1.198, 95% CI 0.392-3.662, P = .751), initial total NIH-CPSI (ORa = 0.983, 95% CI 0.886-1.089, P = .738), number of positive UPOINT domains (ORa = 0.871, 95% CI 0.451-1.681, P = .681), and number of prescribed therapies (ORa = 1.118, 95% CI 0.699-1.789, P = .641).

Conclusion

UPOINT phenotyping and directed therapy is associated with an important improvement in the CP/CPPS. Therapeutic response does not appear to related to age or ethnicity. Clinical improvement is also not predicted by initial extent and severity of the disease, whether relating to NIH-CPSI or the number of positive UPOINT phenotypes, neither to the number of therapies involved in the multimodal treatment strategy.

Other Information

Published in: Urology
License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
See article on publisher's website: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2022.04.028

Funding

Open Access funding provided by the Qatar National Library.

History

Language

  • English

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication Year

  • 2022

License statement

This Item is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Institution affiliated with

  • Hamad Medical Corporation
  • Weill Cornell Medicine - Qatar

Geographic coverage

Middle East and North Africa

Usage metrics

    Hamad Medical Corporation

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