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10.1007_s00167-022-07004-4.pdf (519.68 kB)

Anterior ankle impingment syndrome is less frequent, but associated with a longer absence and higher re-injury rate compared to posterior syndrome: a prospective cohort study of 6754 male professional soccer players

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posted on 2022-11-22, 21:11 authored by Pieter D’Hooghe, Markus Waldén, Martin Hägglund, Håkan Bengtsson, Jan Ekstrand

Purpose

To study the epidemiology and return to play characteristics of anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes (AAIS and PAIS) over 18 consecutive seasons in male professional soccer players.

Methods

Between the 2001–2002 and 2018–2019 seasons, 120 European soccer teams were followed prospectively for various seasons. Time loss injuries and player exposures were recorded individually in 6754 unique players. Injury incidence and burden were reported as the number of injuries and days absence per 1000 h with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Injury severity was reported as median absence in days with the interquartile range (IQR).

Results

Out of 25,462 reported injuries, 93 (0.4%) were diagnosed as AAIS (38%) or PAIS (62%) in 77 players. AAIS and PAIS were similar regarding injury characteristics except for a greater proportion of AAIS having a gradual onset (69% vs.47%; P = 0.03) and being re-injuries (31% vs. 9%; P = 0.01). Impingement syndromes resulted in an overall incidence of 0.03 injuries (95% CI 0.02–0.03) per 1000 h and an injury burden of 0.4 absence days per 1000 h. PAIS incidence was significantly higher than that for AAIS [0.02 (95% CI 0.002–0.03) vs. 0.01 (95% CI 0.005–0.01) injuries per 1000 h (RR = 1.7). The absence was significantly longer in AAIS than in PAIS [10 (22) vs. 6 (11) days; P = 0.023]. Impingement syndromes that presented with a gradual onset had longer absences in comparison to impingement with an acute onset [8 (22) vs. 5 (11) days; P = 0.014]. Match play was associated with a higher incidence and greater injury burden than training: 0.08 vs. 0.02 injuries per 1000 h (RR 4.7), respectively, and 0.9 vs. 0.3 days absence per 1000 h (RR 2.5).

Conclusion

Ankle injuries are frequent in men’s professional soccer and ankle impingement is increasingly recognized as a common source of pain, limited range of motion, and potential time loss. In our study, ankle impingement was the cause of time loss in less than 0.5% of all injuries. PAIS was more frequently reported than AAIS, but AAIS was associated with more absence days and a higher re-injury rate than PAIS. The findings in this study can assist the physician in best practice management on ankle impingment syndromes in professional football.

Level of evidence

II.

Other Information

Published in: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
See article on publisher's website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-022-07004-4

History

Language

  • English

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC

Publication Year

  • 2022

Institution affiliated with

  • Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence

Methodology

Between the 2001–2002 and 2018–2019 seasons, 120 European soccer teams were followed prospectively for various seasons. Time loss injuries and player exposures were recorded individually in 6754 unique players. Injury incidence and burden were reported as the number of injuries and days absence per 1000 h with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Injury severity was reported as median absence in days with the interquartile range (IQR).

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